12 of the Oldest U.S. Structures!

These structures have survived the harshest winters and scorching summers, flooding and lightning strikes, making their histories undeniably interesting. The Cliff Palace of Mesa Verde National Park was constructed in the 1190s by ancestral Puebloans known as the Anasazi. The walls were once decorated with bright earthen plasters, but years of wind and moisture eroded them away, says the National Park Service. The area witnessed the coldest winters and hottest summers, experiencing sporadic droughts. Yet even after the residents were long gone, the stunning sandstone structure still stands strong in its shadowy abode. Charleston’s iconic Pink House was built in the mid-1690s and is known as the longest-standing tavern in the South, says The Pink House Gallery. The home was constructed with ‘Bermuda stone,’ a soft material that is soft and easy to cut but hardens in the elements. The impressive little house showcased its strength when the 1886 Charleston Earthquake hit, damaging several brick buildings surrounding it. The building also survived Hurricane Hugo’s wrath in 1989. (Photo Credit: Wikimedia Commons/Brian Stansberry) Taos Pueblo, built over a thousand years ago, is STILL inhabited and received the honors of being both a UNESCO World Heritage Site and National Historic Landmark. The adobe structure has stood firmly in the face of fires, floods and heavy snow. (Photo Credit: Flickr/Ron Cogswell) The Cathedral of San Juan Bautista, second oldest cathedral in the Americas, was originally built in 1521. The wooden structure was destroyed by a hurricane in 1526 and destroyed again in 1539. Bautista was rebuilt out of stone in 1540, but another hurricane damaged the elegant building in 1615, says Wonder...

Frigid Temperatures Turn Nantucket Water To Slurpee Waves

It has been so frigid outside when photographer Jonathan Nimerfroh was on the coast of Nantucket, Massachusetts, that he was able to capture a truly incredible act of nature at its coldest: The mighty waves of the Atlantic ocean freezing over. The Atlantic Ocean had become a giant salty, slurpee. “I saw these crazy half-frozen waves. Usually on a summer day you can hear the waves crashing, but it was absolutely silent. It was like I had earplugs in my ears.” It’s pretty remarkable he was there to capture these amazing images of the Atlantic-mid-freeze. With snow up to his knees, Nimerfroh trekked to the water where he noticed a “really bizarre horizon.” A week later, Nimerfroh returned to the beach – which was colder by a few more degrees still – “nothing was moving. There were no waves anymore.” The high that day was 19˚F (-7.2˚C) and it hadn’t gotten much higher than that for a few weeks. Source: Boredom...