12 of the Oldest U.S. Structures!

These structures have survived the harshest winters and scorching summers, flooding and lightning strikes, making their histories undeniably interesting. Taos Pueblo, built over a thousand years ago, is STILL inhabited and received the honors of being both a UNESCO World Heritage Site and National Historic Landmark. The adobe structure has stood firmly in the face of fires, floods and heavy snow. (Photo Credit: Flickr/Ron Cogswell) The Fairbanks House takes the title as the oldest surviving timber-frame home in North America, per tree ring dating. The home was built between 1637 and 1641 by Jonathan Fairbanke, a Puritan settler. The home is in superb condition despite its age, weathering severe winter storms, floods and other devices of nature. (Photo Credit: Wikimedia Commons/Magicpiano) The C.A. Nothnagle Log House has surprisingly avoided any major damage due to nature since its construction between 1638 and 1643. It is the oldest log cabin in the United States and was part of the New Sweden colony. Gibbstown is in the southwest climate zone of New Jersey and experiences some of the state’s highest average daily temperatures and nighttime temperatures, says Rutgers University. This likely contibutes to the breakage of the clay that holds the logs together, however, a good samaritan and his wife constantly replace the clay to ensure the cabin continues to stand strong. (Photo Credit: Wikimedia Commons/Smallbones) The Cliff Palace of Mesa Verde National Park was constructed in the 1190s by ancestral Puebloans known as the Anasazi. The walls were once decorated with bright earthen plasters, but years of wind and moisture eroded them away, says the National Park Service. The area witnessed...

Frigid Temperatures Turn Nantucket Water To Slurpee Waves

It has been so frigid outside when photographer Jonathan Nimerfroh was on the coast of Nantucket, Massachusetts, that he was able to capture a truly incredible act of nature at its coldest: The mighty waves of the Atlantic ocean freezing over. The high that day was 19˚F (-7.2˚C) and it hadn’t gotten much higher than that for a few weeks. The Atlantic Ocean had become a giant salty, slurpee. With snow up to his knees, Nimerfroh trekked to the water where he noticed a “really bizarre horizon.” A week later, Nimerfroh returned to the beach – which was colder by a few more degrees still – “nothing was moving. There were no waves anymore.” It’s pretty remarkable he was there to capture these amazing images of the Atlantic-mid-freeze. “I saw these crazy half-frozen waves. Usually on a summer day you can hear the waves crashing, but it was absolutely silent. It was like I had earplugs in my ears.” Source: Boredom...