12 of the Oldest U.S. Structures!

These structures have survived the harshest winters and scorching summers, flooding and lightning strikes, making their histories undeniably interesting. Sandy Hook Lighthouse was built in 1764 and stands as a beacon to incoming ships, spreading it’s soft glow across the bay. In June of 1766, the lighthouse sustained damage after being struck by lightning, according to Lighthousefriends.com. Shore erosion continuously moves the lighthouse further from Sandy Hook’s tip; once just 500 feet away, it now lies over a mile and a half away. However, shore erosion is not deemed a threat to the beautiful lighthouse. Sandy Hook is the oldest operating lightouse in the U.S. (Photo Credit: Flickr/ Jussi (Nesster)) The C.A. Nothnagle Log House has surprisingly avoided any major damage due to nature since its construction between 1638 and 1643. It is the oldest log cabin in the United States and was part of the New Sweden colony. Gibbstown is in the southwest climate zone of New Jersey and experiences some of the state’s highest average daily temperatures and nighttime temperatures, says Rutgers University. This likely contibutes to the breakage of the clay that holds the logs together, however, a good samaritan and his wife constantly replace the clay to ensure the cabin continues to stand strong. (Photo Credit: Wikimedia Commons/Smallbones) Paul Revere’s home is like a time capsule nestled amidst the bustling streets of Boston and is the city’s oldest building. The home survived many brutal winters, including 2015’s string of relentless winter storms, an everlasting symbol of the United States’ road to independence. (Photo Credit: Flickr/Teemu008) Taos Pueblo, built over a thousand years ago, is STILL...

Frigid Temperatures Turn Nantucket Water To Slurpee Waves

It has been so frigid outside when photographer Jonathan Nimerfroh was on the coast of Nantucket, Massachusetts, that he was able to capture a truly incredible act of nature at its coldest: The mighty waves of the Atlantic ocean freezing over. A week later, Nimerfroh returned to the beach – which was colder by a few more degrees still – “nothing was moving. There were no waves anymore.” “I saw these crazy half-frozen waves. Usually on a summer day you can hear the waves crashing, but it was absolutely silent. It was like I had earplugs in my ears.” It’s pretty remarkable he was there to capture these amazing images of the Atlantic-mid-freeze. With snow up to his knees, Nimerfroh trekked to the water where he noticed a “really bizarre horizon.” The high that day was 19˚F (-7.2˚C) and it hadn’t gotten much higher than that for a few weeks. The Atlantic Ocean had become a giant salty, slurpee. Source: Boredom...